Press "Enter" to skip to content

What was the constitutional issue in Tinker v Des Moines?

In a 7-2 decision, the Supreme Court’s majority ruled that neither students nor teachers “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.” The Court took the position that school officials could not prohibit only on the suspicion that the speech might disrupt the learning …

Do you think armband protests should be protected as freedom of speech?

Yes. The Supreme Court ruled that the armbands were a form of symbolic speech, which is protected by the First Amendment, and therefore the school had violated the students’ First Amendment rights.

What did Fraser say in his speech?

Fraser’s speech was as follows: I know a man who is rock hard – he’s firm in his pants, he’s firm in his shirt, his character is firm – but most of all, his belief in you the students of Bethel, is firm. Jeff Kuhlman is a man who takes his point and pounds it in.

What is the disruption rule?

The substantial disruption test is the major standard developed by the U.S. Supreme Court in its seminal student speech K-12 decision Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969) meant to determine when public school officials may discipline students for their expression.

What is the Hazelwood standard?

Facts and case summary for Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, 484 U.S. 260 (1988) The First Amendment rights of student journalists are not violated when school officials prevent the publication of certain articles in the school newspaper.

What is the significance of Hazelwood vs kuhlmeier?

In Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, 484 U.S. 260 (1988), the Supreme Court held that schools may restrict what is published in student newspapers if the papers have not been established as public forums.

Which ruling did the Supreme Court decide in Hazelwood v Kuhlmeier Brainly?

Kuhlmeier” that was decided on January 13, 1988. The Supreme Court decided that the school’s Principal decision of not publishing the articles of the students in the “Spectrum,” the newspaper of the school, did not violate the student’s rights under the 1st Amendment to the United States Constitution.

What were Justice White’s main reasons for ruling in favor of the school district Hazelwood?

Justice Byron White claimed that school authorities were not infringing the First Amendment by controlling what students post on the school paper as this was a pedagogical activity that was originated inside the institution. Therefore, the school principal had the right to ban what he considered inappropriate.

Why do you think Justice Brennan felt the court’s decision taught students the wrong lesson 2 points?

5. Why do you think Justice Brennan felt the Court’s decision taught students the wrong lesson? (1 point) Because they should be taught to respect other people’s values and opinions no matter how different and diverse they are. You may choose to support the majority opinion or Justice Brennan’s dissenting opinion.

How were the results of the Tinker and Hazelwood cases different?

How were the results of the Tinker and Hazelwood cases different? (1 point) The results of Tinker and Hazelwood were different because in Tinker, it was ruled in favor of the students because it was allowed unless it was disruptive but in the Hazelwood case, it ruled in favor of the school because the educators had the …

What freedom is used in the Tinker and Hazelwood cases?

In a famous line from its decision, the Court said that neither students nor teachers “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of expression or speech at the schoolhouse gate.” The Court, however, recognized the unique nature of schools and the legitimate concerns of school officials in maintaining a productive …

What did the ruling in Hazelwood v Kuhlmeier 1983 say about the level of free speech in school newspapers?

Kuhlmeier et al., 484 U.S. 260 (1988), was a landmark decision by the Supreme Court of the United States that held that public school curricular student newspapers that have not been established as forums for student expression are subject to a lower level of First Amendment protection than independent student …

Who won the case of Hazelwood v Kuhlmeier?

Decision: In 1988, the Supreme Court, with one vacancy, handed down a 5-3 decision in favor of the school. The Court reversed the appellate court, and said that public schools do not have to allow student speech if it is inconsistent with the schools’ educational mission.